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VICTIMS OF DIESEL EXPOSURES

Colorectal Cancer

Published on June 17th, 2019 by Andrew L. Hughes

Colorectal cancer (also known as rectal cancer or colon cancer) is a cancer that begins to form in the colon or rectum. Though colon cancer and rectal cancer are two distinct diagnoses, they are often merged together, as the diagnoses share very similar make-ups, symptoms, and treatments.

Most colorectal cancers are detectable through growths on the inner linings of the colon or rectum. These growths, known as polyps, can develop into different forms of cancer. Adenocarcinomas start to form in the mucus inside the colon and rectum, and this form of cancer makes up the vast majority of cases. Other forms of colorectal cancer include carcinoid tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, lymphomas, and sarcomas.

Colorectal cancer has a variety of risk factors that increase a person’s chances of getting the cancer. These risk factors include obesity, poor diet, history of smoking and alcohol use, and family history. In addition to cigarette smoking, toxic exposures to diesel exhaust, asbestos and secondhand smoke can also cause colorectal cancer.

Colorectal Cancer and Diesel Exposures

Our experts can link occupational diesel exhaust exposures to significantly increased risk of colon and rectal cancers. For instance, studies indicate that railroad workers, who regularly endure diesel exposures, are at double the risk for colon cancer compared to non-exposed individuals. Diesel exhaust is composed of compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), benzene, toluene and xylene. All of those components are associated with increased risk for colon and/or rectal cancers. We prove medical causation in our cases by studying these unique components of diesel exhaust, many of which are also found in cigarette smoke.

Other Exposures That Cause Colorectal Cancers

Many workers with diesel exposures are also subject to other toxic exposures. Shop workers utilizing solvents and degreasers are at increased risk for colon and rectal cancers. Petroleum-based solvents contain many of the same carcinogens found in diesel exhaust, such as benzene and toluene.

Asbestos exposures can lead to colorectal cancer. Asbestos can be found in insulation, cement, brakes, clutches, gaskets and other materials used in industrial settings. When ingested, asbestos fibers can pass through the digestive track and increase the risk of colorectal cancer.

Not surprisingly, secondhand smoke exposures put individuals at risk for colon and rectal cancers. The U.S. Surgeon General has linked the relationship between cigarette smoke and colorectal cancers. Non-smokers forced to work around smokers are at elevated risk for colon cancer.

Though researchers continue to investigate their relationship, some studies have found ties between pesticides and herbicides and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Pesticides and herbicides are most often found in the farming industry and have been known to contribute to a multitude of other disorders and illnesses in humans, including Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

Diesel Injury Law will take all these exposures into account when proving up your case.

Importance of Colorectal Cancer Screenings

Colorectal cancer symptoms occur when the cancer is a bit more advanced than its initial stages. Some symptoms that may appear include changes in bowel habits, such as diarrhea and constipation; rectal bleeding or blood in the stool; unintentional or unexplained weight loss; fatigue; and pain in the abdominal region. Additionally, one of the first signs of colorectal cancer is commonly a blood test showing low red blood cell counts, as the cancer can lead to blood loss when left undetected for a longer period of time. (cancer.org)

Because blood tests can indicate whether colorectal cancer exists, they are often used to help diagnose the cancer. Other tests to find colorectal cancer include colonoscopies, biopsies of suspicious areas of the colon or rectum, and ultrasounds. Once diagnosed, colorectal cancer can be treated in many ways. Like other cancers, chemotherapy and radiation may be used to reduce the cancer’s size and eliminate the bad cells. Additionally, the patient can opt for surgery to remove the tumor from the colon or rectum. Treatment for colorectal cancer is dependent on the stage of the cancer and each patient’s individual needs.

Contact a Diesel Injury Lawyer

If you believe you are suffering from colorectal cancer due to toxic exposures, our team at Diesel Injury Law can fight on your behalf. Contact us today to get started.

COLORECTAL CANCER CASES

$2,150,000 verdict – 64-year-old plumber and pipe fitter was diagnosed with colorectal cancer, alleging that the cancer stemmed from his 10-year employment with packing that was manufactured by John Crane Inc. and J.A. Sexauer Manufacturing Co. The packing materials released fibers into the air that contained asbestos. Plaintiff received a $2 million award for compensatory damages, and his wife received a $150,000 award for loss of consortium.
(Timothy Wysocki and Arlene Wysocki v. John Crane Inc. f/k/a Crane Packing Co.; Chicago Faucets; Cleaver Brooks; Crane Co.; Crosby Valve LLC; DAP Inc.; Drever Co.; Fort Kent Holdings Inc. f/k/a Dunham-Bush Inc.; Durametallic Inc.; Elkhart Brass Manufacturing Co.; Foster Wheeler Corp.; Gallagher Fluid Seals Inc. f/k/a Walter B. Gallagher Co.; Gerber Plumbing Fixtures LLC; Greene Tweed & Co.; Honeywell International Inc., as success-in-interest to Honeywell Inc.; J.A. Sexauer Manufacturing Co.; Keeler/Dorr-Oliver Boiler Co.; Kohler Co.; Lennox Industries Inc.; Metallo Gasket Co.; Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.; Milwaukee Valve Co.; NIBCO Inc.; Peerless Pump; Sid Harvey Industries Inc.; Spirax Sarco Inc.; SPX Cooling Technologies Inc., as successor-in-interest to Marley Cooling Towers; Trane US Inc. f/k/a American Standard Inc.; Watts Water Technologies Inc., Weil McLain Co.; Ace Hardware Corp.; Zurn Industries Inc.; American Biltrite Inc.; Amtico; A.O. Smith Corp.; Barnes & Jones Inc.)
Undisclosed Settlement – plaintiff was diagnosed with colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and other asbestos-related issues after exposure to asbestos-containing products during a 13-year employment as a steelworker.
(Robert C. Knibbs, Sr.; and Terry Knibbs v. Pfizer, Inc.; Allied Signal, Inc.; Air & Liquid Systems Corporation, as successor by merger to Buffalo Pumps; Bayer Cropscience LP, successor-in-interest to Amchem Products, Inc.; Borg Warner Morse TEC, as successor-by-merger to Borg Warner Corporation; CBS Corporation f/k/a Viacom, Inc., successor by merger to CBS Corporation f/k/a Westinghouse Electric Corporation; et al)

$250,000 verdict – Refining company worker died of colon cancer after six years of exposure to asbestos in his workplace.
(Cassin, Estate of v. Owens-Corning Fiberglas)

$700,000 verdict – During his 14-year employment, plaintiff worked with asbestos in the manufacturing of gaskets. Plaintiff alleged that over time, this exposure significantly contributed to his colon cancer diagnosis.
(Grassis v. Johns Manville et al.)

$1,083,000 verdict – 60-year-old pipefitter and steamfitter was diagnosed with stage I colon cancer after working at Exxon Mobile Corp’s Benicia refinery for 7 years. Plaintiff alleged that he was exposed to asbestos by working with asbestos gaskets, packing, and welding blankets.
(Merle Sandy v. Exxon Mobile Corp.)

$1,130,000 verdict – plaintiff was diagnosed with asbestos-related colon cancer and asbestosis. The jury found that the plaintiff’s employer was responsible for failing to provide safety programs and a reasonably safe place to work.
(Arville Dews; John Hayes; Charles Leroy McClenny; Mack A. Miller; Robert Earl Moore; Arthalia Porter, Jr.; Clayton Douglas Seals; and Lee Roy Vaughn vs. Swan Transportation Company f/k/a Tyler Pipe In)

$17,258,419 verdict – plaintiff worked for twenty-seven years as a petroleum inspector employed by numerous independent contractors. During five of those years, he worked on premises or vessels owned by Chevron, Texaco and Union Oil. While working on defendants’ premises and vessels, he was regularly exposed to benzene. Years later, as a result of his benzene exposures, the plaintiff was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia and colon cancer.
(McWilliams v. Chevron USA et al.)

$9,180,000 verdict – plaintiff was diagnosed with colon cancer and asbestosis after being exposed to asbestos on the job.
(DEWS, ARVILLE; HAYES, JOHN; MCCLENNY, CHARLES v. SWAN TRANSPORTATION CO FKA TYLER PIPE INDUSTRIES)

 

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